Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Photos’ Category

summer cruisin’

My friend Katie, making Malibu look like a dream come true.

freeways and freight trains

It was the day after the election and I went down to Rincon. We were all a bunch of zombies stumbling around on Mars, but the surf was firing. In California we build freeways next to beaches, which is a weird sort of habit, but so are a lot of things. On the wall beneath the freeway, someone had voted with a spraycan. They wanted Tom Curren, local legend and three-time world champion to be president, instead of the guy who’d won the election. Pot smoke hung languid on the breeze, unthinkably beautiful waves rushed down the point, a luminous orange sun slid down the sky. And in that moment, it felt like nothing had changed at all.

drive

I did a little road trip up the coast last week. I had a work thing to do in Napa, but I decided to take the round-about way to get there. I drove to Santa Cruz, then up highway 1 to Pacifica. If you need a place to stay within reach of San Francisco, but not in San Francisco, Pacifica is pretty great. It’s stupid scenic. Stupid.

Also, the Holiday Inn Express is super clean and overlooks the ocean. The lovely man at the front desk gave me a room upgrade which is pretty much the best thing ever. I got a sandwich at Dinosaur’s with tofu and other things on it and some spring rolls and it ruled the world. The only thing missing in Pacifica is solid espresso, but really, you can’t have everything in life.

So yeah, drive from Santa Cruz to Pacifica sometime. You can see the weird old bunker at Devil’s Slide and a whole bunch of ocean. Very cold, windy ocean. Which is alright, really. You’re not actually going to go in it, you’re just going to look at it. And it’s scenic as fuck.

After the scenic, windy, freezing ocean part, I drove through San Francisco, where I cruised the Great Highway and saw more freezing, windy ocean parts. Also, I guess some sharks live there, but I didn’t see any.

#novanlife

ghostbikes

The ghostbike dedicated to Salvador Barragan leans locked to a palm tree in Oxnard, California. Unbroken lines of cars stream down the four-lane road past the stripped-down, white-painted bike. A faded tag on the wall recalls a turf war, likely long forgotten by now. The wall, built of pale pink cinder blocks, is a typical sight in California, dividing backyards from roadways, preserving the illusion of tranquility against the rush of suburban life. Barragan died after he was hit by a driver making a u-turn.

Ghostbikes are fleeting, ephemeral memorials to cyclists killed by cars while riding their bikes. The bikes, their parts removed, are painted white and placed on the roadside. Most ghostbikes are removed very soon after they’re placed. Maybe it’s easier that way. On rare occasions, a ghostbike may stand for many months, a stark reminder of a last ride and a life cut short.

A while back, I did a photo essay for Bicycling on ghostbikes and it’s now live. The first ghostbikes were placed in St. Louis, Missouri in 2003 and they’ve since become a near-universal symbol for a downed cyclist. I interviewed a pair of activists in Southern California and photographed a series of memorials for the project. Head to Bicycling.com to see the story.

Of course, there were way more photos than we eventually ran, because that’s how it always works out. If you’d like to see the rest of the images, I put a ghostbikes gallery over on my photo site.

lizard life

I went out to Southern Utah and played bikes with a crew of women. Southern Utah has crazy weather, on the whole. Last year when I was at Tour of Utah for Bicycling, it was all thunderstorms and flash flooding. The Dodge Dart did not like the flash flooding. This time around, it was rain. And hail.

But we rode bikes anyway and ate a lot of great food and drank beers around the fire. And then we rode bikes some more. Western Spirit handled the food and trail guiding and Diamondback dialed in the bikes. I recommend Southern Utah for all your bike riding and camping needs. It’s good out there.

My friend Kate wrote a story about our trip out to the desert for Cool Hunting and you can see more of my pictures from the trip there.

Back home, out of the desert, hammering keyboards, wearing the letters off. My keyboard is missing a bunch of letters. It’s totally fine. Nothing to worry about.

go fast

anneke

Take chances. Anneke Beerten, Sea Otter Classic dual slalom.

chill vibes

cr_boat

Recently I had the chance to travel to Nosara, Costa Rica. The chillest vibes, you guys, the chillest. Nosara is around three hours from airport in Liberia, through jungled coastal mountain ranges, along winding dirt roads. It’s the kind of place where you want to turn off your phone and stay awhile. Also, there’s surf. Warm water, bikini-ready, surf. A++ would go again.

find the coast

whitebikewatermark2

It’s not blue. But it poses pretty nice for photos. Look! There’s more.

adventures in the forest

umpqua_bloggy

So bike packing, in the rain, in Oregon, is a pretty hard thing to do. But beautiful! And highly recommended, though maybe without the rain part. I think I’d skip the rain part.

I spend three days on the North Umpqua River Trail with Specialized. We rode the Hellga fat bike, went fly fishing, and drank a little whiskey. Hey! It was raining! You can’t go adventuring in the rain without whiskey.

During all these shenanigans, I carried a camera bag. It began to feel like part of my body, actually. Should you need to carry cameras long enough for them to feel like part of your body, Fstop bags are the way to go. They crush, basically.

Also, Goretex socks. If you’re going to go adventuring in the rain, you need Goretex socks. And whiskey.

I made a photo essay for Bicycling Magazine about the trip. Making pictures in the rain in the Oregon forest was not easy! It was really dark! I’ve never shot ISO 25,000 at noon before! Light. I like light.

Anyway, it all worked alright. Read more over at Bicycling!

espresso

salvatore_machine2

I would not mind waking up to this set-up in my kitchen. Salvatore makes custom espresso machines in a workshop just outside Solvang. His metalwork is amazing. I wrote all about Salvatore and how to make the best possible morning espresso for the October issue of Bicycling Magazine.

If you’re into espresso, bikes, cool things made out of metal, Italy — whatever you’re into, go find yourself a copy of Bicycling. I’m happy to have done the photography for the story, too. Read words, look at pictures, drink espresso. Life is good.

Also, you can read this story online if you have some kind of weird aversion to paper. So go do it already.